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Autonomous testing suspended after Fatal Self-Driving Uber Crash

Autonomous testing suspended after Fatal Self-Driving Uber Crash

Autonomous testing suspended after Fatal Self-Driving Uber Crash

On March 18, 2018, a self-driving car owned by Uber struck and killed a pedestrian in Arizona. As a result, of the collision Uber has suspended the companies self-driving test across North America until further notice. Other companies who are in the autonomous vehicle business have also suspended testing due to the recent collision. Many CEO’s and Government Officials have commented on the recent collision stating while the end goal is to promote a safer commute for everyone “No one should take shortcuts and no one should put out technology before its ready.”

Tech firms, government officials put the brakes on testing self-driving vehicles after fatal Uber crash

Both Uber and Lyft are rapidly taking over Colorado and national paid-transportation services market. The astonishing advance of ridesharing companies presented Colorado with a potential significant source of revenue for Denver International Airport.
In 2015, ridesharing companies accounted for $1.23 million in airport revenues, behind taxis at nearly $2.2 million and limousines at $1.7 million. In the first three quarters of 2017, ridesharing provided $4.5 million to the airport, taxis were down to $1.3 million, and limos were at $838,586. However, with inadequate tracking on the part of DIA, and under-reporting from the ridesharing companies, DIA is losing a significant revenue stream from parking fees that would otherwise generate income from public.
It is important to know that the motor vehicle collisions involving Uber and Lyft are on the rise as well. In Colorado, Uber and Lyft can provide significant coverage to cover the losses of the injured person. If you are involved in a collision involving ride-sharing services, please contact Larson & Larimer to speak with one of our attorneys.

DIA does not track Uber and Lyft rides, opening risk of losing revenue, Denver auditor warns